Rhyming God

 

Rhyming God


Be he alive Be he dead


songs of Job and Zarathustra


Performance by Adrin Neatrour

 
 
Rhyming God
 


 

Rhyming God


Be he alive Be he dead


songs of Job and Zarathustra


Performance by Adrin Neatrour

 
 
Rhyming God
 


 

Rhyming God


Be he alive Be he dead


songs of Job and Zarathustra


Performance by Adrin Neatrour

 



Next performance:


 21st July 2018


MAP Studio Cafe
46 Grafton Road
London
NW5 3DU
8PM
Tickets £5 £5.00(on door)
Box Office: 0207 916 0545
mapstudiocafe.com

About


Rhyming God - outside classical Greek theatre God is not a personage that takes centre stage in Western Theatre, either as an absence or as a presence. Direct physical representation of God was in most religious cultures effectively censored. But in aggressively secular societies you might think that the gloves so to speak, might come off. But they haven’t.

In polite civil society God or even the idea of god exists only as cause for embarrassment.

So be prepared to blush. Rhyming God’s purpose is to put god back on the MAP (sic).
Not rhyming the banalities of Richard Dawkins or contemporary religious apologists. Rather rhyming the case hardened verses of the Old Testament and Nietzsche’s alter ego, Zarathustra.

The interweaving of Nietzsche and the Book of Job seemed to me to be a way of having some serious fun. Job takes as his starting point one who makes a moral demand of God; Nietzsche takes as his starting point Zarathustra’s moral demand on man.

Enough! The scene is set. Let’s call for the lights, and half in jest totally in earnest bring on the clown, the death of God may just be a distraction.

Rhyming God – there’s some jokes a few songs a dance or two, and a set of ladders.
Rhyming God - God takes the stage takes a bow tells us how it’s done.
Rhyming God – Zarathustra comes down the mountain, calls out in the market place.
Rhyming God - metaphysics pataphysics or whackiphysics? Kant Jarry or Groucho?
Rhyming God – an all action playing out of the stories of Job and Zarathustra.
Rhyming God - calls to the audience to their destiny or find their inner Nietzsche.

Outside Greek theatre and medieval mystery gigs takes on God are rare in theatre. Traditionally the subject of God has been seen as blasphemous and so censored. Appearences by Niezsche and Zarathustra are even rarer. Make what you will. Traditionally their names have been blackened by false association with Nazism. In an agressively secular age Rhyming God corrects these omissions, unleashing the mask of the clown to combat the forces of preconception and prejudice.

Rhyming God - A scabrous examination of the existence of God and Man interweaving the books of Job and Zarathustra, taking as its starting point one who makes a moral demand on god and one who makes a moral demand on man.

Riddle me riddle me riddle me ree
Job and Nietzsche rhyming god
answer the riddle and you’re free
to tell if god’s alive or not!

In other words dear audience the riddle is as much yours as mine. Be warned!


Pete Mortimer writes in the British Theatre Guide:

"Adrin Neatrour’s quirky one-man plays have previously taken on stories by Kafka and Dostoevsky, investing them with the comic and the grotesque, evoking both the clownish and the intellectual.
Neatrour’s expressive face, body and voice are perfect vehicles for this kind of thing; he can within minutes put us at ease then make us squirm in our seats.

Drawing on the Book of Job and the Zarathustra story and dressed in a long thin leopard-skin coat, red nose and headband, the actor moves constantly about the stage, occasionally climbing up a totemic black-draped structure. He embarks on a journey of exploration taking in the Bible and Nietzsche among others, aware that such potentially heavy stuff does need a light touch, hence the cavorting, the song and dance, the nursery rhyme, the constantly changing voices and expressions.

The performance on many levels is a remarkable tour-de-force, the conclusion is that humanity has killed God and we are then led to the inevitable second conclusion that the same humanity is now killing the earth."